Hope2012


Alternatives: Rewilding, Remediation and Restoration

Neem: a tree for solving global problems

Charcoal Biofilter Cleans Up Fertilizer Waste Gases

How Mushrooms Eat Oil

Wolves Can Help Restore Ecosystems

300-year-old technology good enough for Savannah National Wildlife Refuge

Simple wooden structures called rice field trunks do a better job of controlling tidal flooding in Low Country rice fields than more modern technology.

Urban Biofilter Project Plants Bamboo Forests to Clean up Brownfields

How to Plant 60 Million Mangrove Trees in 3 Months (Slideshow)

Wildlands Restoration Volunteers engages thousands in the restoration of public lands

Toxic Soil Busters: Youth Reverse Inner-City Lead Pollution (Video)

Earthworms Could Be Used to Clean Up Hazardous Toxins in Soil

Seaweed Could Be the Key to Cleaning Up Polluted Waters

Reversing desertification with livestock 

Phytoremediation: Using Plants to Clean Soil

The Intelligence of Mushrooms in Environmental Restoration

Mycova: Helping the Ecosystem through Mushroom Cultivation by Paul Stamets

Mycoremediation – using fungi to clean up oil spills (video)



Models for Developing Sustainable Water Systems

DIY Greywater Recycling in Los Angeles

In New Mexico, Ancient Traditions Keep Desert Waters Flowing

How a Tiny Town Sent an International Water Giant Packing

Community Water Solutions in Action in Laos

DropNet Fog Collector Harvests the Mist to Create Pure Drinking Water

Could Prickly Pear Cactus Be The Secret to Cheap, Clean Water?

Life Sack Solves Drinking Water Issues for the Third World

Advice for Water Warriors

“Every now and then in history, the human race takes a collective step forward in its evolution. Such a time is upon us now.” Maude Barlow on how to move the water justice movement forward.

Tear Down the Dam and Rebuild the Commons

The battle of the small Mexican town of Temacapulin to prevent a large dam from being constructed and submerging their home.

The Water Crisis: A Practical Solution

One practical solution to the water shortage is to replace our centralized water based sewer system with on site, waterless toilets and recycle grey water. Grey water is the water from the kitchen and shower and can be recycled, on site and reused for landscaping. This will reduce our demand on the water source by 80 percent while simultaneously creating a sustainable, renewable, agricultural resource, namely, organic nitrogen.



Models for a Different Society: Cooperatives, Economy, Education & Transportation

Here’s an Idea: Share Things with Your Neighbors

Sure, we have Zipcar, bike sharing, and even tool shares, but Good wants to know why this sort of thing isn’t more popular.

Shareable: stories of sharing and cooperation

“Shareable tells the story of sharing. We cover the people, places, and projects that are bringing a shareable world to life. And share tools and tips to help you make a shareable world real in your life. In a shareable world, things like car sharing, community gardening, and cohousing bring us together, make life more fun, and free up time and money for the important things in life. When we share, not only is a better life possible, but so is a better world. The remarkable successes of Wikipedia, Kiva, open source software, Burning Man, Freecycle, and Creative Commons point the way. They tell a hopeful story about human nature and our future, one we don’t hear enough in the mainstream media.”

Tool Lending Libraries: A Product Service System that Works! – Treehugger 12/29/08

The New Old Age: A Caring Collaborative – NYTimes 12/29/08

A community-based model is changing the way people band together and care for one another.

How to Put Detroit Back to Work – Alternet 5/18/09

Why not retain workers who know how to manufacture complex machines and make use of exhausted auto factories, rather than letting them crumble?

Summer Downsizing: 31 Ways to Jumpstart Your Local Economy – Alternet 7/9/09

Intriguing Plan in Michael Moore’s Home Town: Bulldoze the Ghost ‘Burbs, Return Them to Nature – Alternet 6/13/09

Food-backed Local Money – The Oil Drum 3/4/09

Creative Food Economy Emerges in Ontario – Treehugger 3/9/09

Factories without Bosses: Argentina’s Experience with Worker-Run Enterprises – 2006

ARGENTINA: Workers Take Factories into Their Own Hands – CorpWatch 11/21/02

Last orders? Locals fight back – Guardian, UK 3/20/09

Every week 39 pubs shut down. Petrol stations lie abandoned. Post Offices are closing. But as Miles Brignall reports, community companies may be the answer.  From the far north of Scotland to the western tip of Cornwall, a quiet revolution is taking place. Britons, no longer prepared to take the closure of a community’s essential amenities lying down, are joining forces to take them back into local ownership.  Pubs that had lain empty for several months are being brought back to life by villagers. Stores that closed down after no buyer could be found are reopening as community-owned co-ops. And in some villages they have even got together to reopen their local petrol stations through limited-liability community companies.

Welcome to the fast-expanding world of the not-for-profit community buyout, which in most cases is funded by local people, putting up their own money and taking shares in any profit.  The Plunkett Foundation estimates there are now close to 200 community-owned rural shops in the UK, with four new ventures opening this month alone.

Middle School Teachers Pioneer New Globally Focused Environmental Education Plans – Treehugger 12/9/08

Bike-Sharing Goes Global: 5 Programs You Should Know About – Treehugger 9/5/08

5 Examples of Better Bike Infrastructure – Treehugger 1/19/09

A Radical Proposal: Restore Atrophied US Rail System to 1920’s Levels – Treehugger 5/17/09

RELATED:  Models for a Different Society: Food, Water, Land & Housing



Models for a Different Society: Food, Water, Land & Housing

Ecuador Extends Rights To Ecosystems – Treehugger 1/18/09

Bolivia leader redistributes land – BBC 3/15/09

Looking ahead, Brazil’s farmers take up reforestation

Top Ten Natural Ways to Remove Heavy Metals – Natural News 8/20/09

Reintroducing Wolves to Scotland Could Bring Back the Forests of Old – Treehugger 7/23/09

Sand Dams An Answer To World’s Water Woes? (Video)

How the Bushmen of Africa Can Save Us from the Global Water Crisis (Video)  – Treehugger 11/9/09

Citizen-Led Groups Leading the Way for New Water Policy – Alternet 6/30/09

Fog Catchers Bring Water to Parched Villages – National Geographic 7/8/09

A rain-starved community in Peru collects hundreds of gallons of water a day using special fog-catching nets.

The Cheonggyecheon, Once a Highway, Now a Haven – NYTimes 7/16/09

In what is sometimes called “daylighting,” cities from San Antonio to Singapore are resuscitating waterways that once lay buried under rivers of concrete

Making Sweet Water From (Almost) Perpetual Motion – Forbes 9/7/09

Destroying Levees in a State Usually Clamoring for Them – NYTimes 6/19/09

Two brothers plan to return a muddy river in northern Louisiana to its ancient floodplain by removing miles of levees.

How to Craft Water Democracy, Earth Democracy & Survive Climate Change: TreeHugger Interviews Dr. Vandana Shiva  

Cochabamba: From War to Water Management – Alternet 6/2/09

The poor of Bolivia drove out the neoliberal model of water management. Now, they are fighting for equitable community control.

How to Get Your Home Off the Water “Grid” – Alternet 2/9/09 

Peter Gleick: How We Can Avoid a World Without Water – Alternet 2/19/09

Incredible Edible: How To Make Your Town Self-sufficient

8 Ways to Join the Local Food Movement – Alternet 4/1/09

How to turn a lawn into lunch, swap preserves, glean, boost your food security and live the good life.

Buy, Sell, or Trade Homegrown Produce With Veggie Trader – Treehugger 3/25/09

Food-backed Local Money – The Oil Drum 3/4/09

Creative Food Economy Emerges in Ontario – Treehugger 3/9/09

Ten Things You Can Do to Start a Community Garden – The Nation 9/9/09

Brazilian City Makes Food A Basic Right And Ends Hunger – Treehugger 3/14/09

The City that Ended Hunger – YES! Magazine via Global Research 8/18/09

In just a decade Belo Horizonte cut its infant death rate, widely used as evidence of hunger, by more than half, and today these initiatives benefit almost 40 percent of the city’s 2.5 million population. One six-month period in 1999 saw infant malnutrition in a sample group reduced by 50 percent. And between 1993 and 2002 Belo Horizonte was the only locality in which consumption of fruits and vegetables went up.

The cost of these efforts?  Around $10 million annually, or less than 2 percent of the city budget. That’s about a penny a day per Belo resident.

Behind this dramatic, life-saving change is what Adriana calls a “new social mentality”-the realization that “everyone in our city benefits if all of us have access to good food, so-like health care or education-quality food for all is a public good.”…  “I knew we had so much hunger in the world,” Adriana said. “But what is so upsetting, what I didn’t know when I started this, is it’s so easy. It’s so easy to end it.”  Adriana’s words have stayed with me. They will forever. They hold perhaps Belo’s greatest lesson: that it is easy to end hunger if we are willing to break free of limiting frames and to see with new eyes-if we trust our hard-wired fellow feeling and act, no longer as mere voters or protesters, for or against government, but as problem-solving partners with government accountable to us.

Planning: Lawn Be Gone: The time has come for edible front yards. – The Localizers 8/16/09

Crop Swap: Free Food in Hard Times – Treehugger 7/21/09

High Rise Farms? The New Model for Sustainable Cities – Alternet 4/20/09

Americans growing ‘recession gardens’ – CNN 4/1/09

People to the Power: Energy Utility Provides Community Garden Plots – Treehugger 5/14/09

LA Times on guerrilla gardeners – BoingBoing 6/1/08

Crop Mob One Year On: NC Land ‘Raids’ Continue

News of a large group of landless young people invading a farm tends to bring images of revolution. And NC-based Crop Mob does indeed have revolution in mind, but the group’s methods are more about giving than taking. As I noted in my original post on Crop Mob, the organization is part of a wider resurgence of young people taking up farming. It was borne out of a discussion group on the problems facing young farmers, but rather than sit around talking about challenges, the group decided it was better off getting things done. So, armed with hoes, shovels, wheelbarrows, and bucket-loads of good will, the Mob has been descending on local farms to offer a helping hand. And after a full year of Mobbing, the idea is spreading.

Can A Farm-in-a-Backpack Feed Sub-Saharan Africa?

Rice Biodiversity Techniques Remain Intact in Rural Thailand – Treehugger 8/1/09

DIY fridge uses almost no energy – Mother Nature Network 8/21/09

From Arid, Salty Desert to Permaculture Garden: Greening the Desert Revisited (Video)

Growing Food, and Community, in the Desert

 A cynic might look at a program like the Edible Schoolyard — the much-lauded school garden initiative launched by Chez Panisse’s Alice Waters — and wonder if such a thing would be possible outside the favorable growing climes (and foodie sensibilities) of California, and without the support of a famous chef. But as a moving article by a young teacher in rural Arizona shows, the answer is a resounding “yes.”

[analysis] The Food Sovereignty Movement in Venezuela, Part 1

[analysis] The Food Sovereignty Movement in Venezuela, Part 2

Circular Hakka Houses Create Self-Sustaining Communities – Inhabitat 11/13/09

How To Live Without Air Conditioning: Syrian Beehive Houses – Treehugger 8/6/09

Utopian Communes in the British Isles – via Metafilter 9/25/09

Transition Towns in America: UK Pioneer Interviewed (Video) – Treehugger 2/2/09

Transition Towns USA in the New York Times – Treehugger 4/22/09

The Transition Handbook – via Metafilter 2/21/09

The Transition Handbook should be helpful to you if you are a proponent of planned energy descent and independence from fossil fuels and would like to start a Transition Town of your own.  The transition model emboldens communities to look peak oil and climate change squarely in the eye and unleash the collective genius of their own people to find the answers to this big question: for all those aspects of life that this community needs in order to sustain itself and thrive

Los Angeles Ecovillage: Building a Sustainable Urban Community (Video) – Treehugger 1/30/09

Tribe Weaves Floating Islands, Homes and Boats on Lake Titicaca – Treehugger 1/14/09

RELATED: Models for a Different Society: Cooperatives, Economy, Education & Transportation



Practical Advice for Food Survivalism

Wild Girl Goes Urban Foraging in Portland – Treehugger 5/28/09

Get to Know Your Edible Outdoor Greens [Food Hunting]  – LifeHacker 5/22/09

Food Foraging Lessons for the Recession – Treehugger 1/7/09

Short documentary about urban foragers in Chicago – Boing Boing 1/7/09

Green gold rush as foraging surges – Guardian, UK 4/26/09

Robert Jensen : Future Farming: an Interview with Wes Jackson – CounterPunch 1/30/09

How You Can Start a Farm in Heart of the City – Alternet 1/9/09

Square Foot Gardening – via Metafilter 5/24/09

Homegrown Grains: The Key to Food Security  – Alternet 5/28/09

Solar Cooking, Electric and Heat: SolSource 3-in-1 – Treehugger 6/5/09

CSA gaining ground nationwide – Raw Story 5/9/09

Sowing the Seeds of Sustainability: Victory Gardens are Back! – Treehugger 6/8/09

How Communities Grow Free Food (Video)  – Treehugger 6/25/09

Taking Down the Corporate Food System Is Simple – Alternet 6/20/09

From Community Supported Agriculture to a Community Supported Kitchen – Treehugger 11/27/08

Your Asphalt Parking Spot Can Become a Blooming Garden Plot – Alternet 4/7/08

Baking Bread is a Political Act: Resurgence Mag’s Slow Sunday – Treehugger 9/22/08

Back to the future of food – Metafilter 6/29/09

Canning makes a comeback. Is it just another foodie trend? Or is canning back for good?
Eating locally has been the trend for a while now, but in-home food preservation is starting to make a comeback. And with more people gardening, it’s time to learn how to preserve those delicious delights of summer. Everyone’s saying it’s yet another indicator of a more frugal America.

How to get started? Well, here are some neat blogs: Food in Jars, Doris and Jilly, Bumblebee Blog

And lots of references: National Center for Home Food Preservation, Ball Book of Home Preserving, Canning USA

This year Ball has everything you need to get started, but really all you need are some jars and some other stuff you may already own.



Finding Solutions to Our Environmental & Environmental Health Crises

5 Natural Survival Tactics to Defend Against Terrorist Attack – Treehugger 4/19/09

Ten Super Plants Fighting the Environmental Injustice League – Miller McCune 5/5/09

Who ya gonna call when your tank’s on ‘E,’ the topsoil’s salty or there’s too much TNT? The 10 plants Miller-McCune.com believes can save the world, that’s who.

Biochar 101 – Mother Nature Network 7/9/09

It removes carbon dioxide from the air, improves soil quality and creates clean energy — and it’s surprisingly easy to come by.

How To Make Biochar & Bio-Oil, Re:Char Demonstrates (Video) – Treehugger 5/19/09

Guerrilla Gardeners Attack Empty Flyer Boxes With Minty Goodness – Treehugger 6/3/09

How to Plan an Ecological Water-Harvesting System for Your Home – Alternet 5/18/09 

Japan plans underwater sponges to soak up uranium – Telegraph, UK 6/16/09

Using Sea Shells to Remove Heavy Metals from Water – Treehugger 4/28/09

Boy discovers microbe that eats plastic – Mother Nature Network 6/12/09

Will Allen’s Innovative Aquaculture System Insprires Commercial Application – Treehugger 2/9/09

How to Start a Traditional Compost Pile in Your Yard – Alternet 5/28/09

Purifying Water Through Gravity – GreenTech Media 2/24/09

Electrolyzed water, aka el liquido milagroso – BoingBoing 2/23/09

The LA Times’ Marla Dickerson reports on a cheap way to turn water and salt into a degreaser and sanitizer.

Used as a sanitizer for decades in Russia and Japan, it’s slowly winning acceptance in the United States. A New York poultry processor uses it to kill salmonella on chicken carcasses. Minnesota grocery clerks spray sticky conveyors in the checkout lanes. Michigan jailers mop with electrolyzed water to keep potentially lethal cleaners out of the hands of inmates.In Santa Monica, the once-skeptical Sheraton housekeeping staff has ditched skin-chapping bleach and pungent ammonia for spray bottles filled with electrolyzed water to clean toilets and sinks.

Australian researchers find honey capable of fighting superbugs – Mathaba 6/22/09

It is well known that honey has anti-bacterial properties but scientists from the University of Sydney believe a particular type derived from native tea tree is especially potent.

Preserving Biodiversity Helps Prevent Disease Spread from Animals to People: New Research Spells It Out – Treehugger 7/8/09

Bypass in a Pill – L-Arginine – Dr Joe’s Diebetes blog 2/2/09

How to Slash World Cancer Rates By 90 Percent: Healthy Foods, Exercise and Vitamin D – Natural News 2/26/09

Hoxsey – How Healing Becomes A Crime. alt. cancer cure – Google Video 5/1/09 

This documentary concerns Harry M. Hoxsey, the former coal miner whose family’s herbal recipe has brought about claims of a cancer cure. Starting in 1924 with his first clinic, he expanded to 17 states by the mid 1950s, along the way constantly battling organized medicine that labeled him a charlatan. Hoxsey’s supporters point out he was the victim of arrests, or “quackdowns” spearheaded by the proponents of established medical practices. Interviews of patients satisfied with the results of the controversial treatment are balanced with physicians from the FDA and the AMA. A clinic in Tijuana, Mexico claims an 80% success rate, while opponents are naturally skeptical.    



Even more reasons not to use biofuels

Stan Cox : Biofuel’s Drug Problem – CounterPunch 6/9/09

Corn Ethanol Worse than Oil? California Rules Yes – Treehugger 4/20/09

So Thirsty: Corn Ethanol Uses Up to 300% More Water than Previously Thought – Treehugger 4/14/09

Robert Bryce : Why the Promise of Biofuels is a Lie – CounterPunch 2/21/09

 The Higher Cost of Biofuels – Center for Media and Democracy 2/11/09

A new study found that there is a higher health cost associated with corn-based biofuels than with traditional energy forms. The researchers “found the total environmental and health costs of gasoline are about 71 cents (50p) per gallon, while an equivalent amount of corn-ethanol fuel has associated costs of 72 cents to $1.45, depending on how it is produced.” The health concerns include “increased cases of heart disease, respiratory symptoms, asthma, chronic bronchitis or premature death.” There is also concern that using a food crop for fuel will continue to drive up the cost of foodstuffs, affecting everyone, but especially the most vulnerable populations. There is evidence that the costs associated with the next generation of biofuels could be much lower. Those products may be produced from organic waste or plants that are grown on non-agricultural land.

Biofuels may increase global warming – Raw Story 2/14/09

New Study Finds Corn-based Ethanol More Harmful Than Oil-based Gasoline – Treehugger 2/7/09

 

Previously: Biofuel Posts